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Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2014 Aug;28(4):747-64, vii. doi: 10.1016/j.hoc.2014.04.002.

Use of magnetic resonance imaging to monitor iron overload.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA; Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA. Electronic address: jwood@chla.usc.edu.

Abstract

Treatment of iron overload requires robust estimates of total-body iron burden and its response to iron chelation therapy. Compliance with chelation therapy varies considerably among patients, and individual reporting is notoriously unreliable. Even with perfect compliance, intersubject variability in chelator effectiveness is extremely high, necessitating reliable iron estimates to guide dose titration. In addition, each chelator has a unique profile with respect to clearing iron stores from different organs. This article presents the tools available to clinicians to monitor their patients, focusing on noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging methods because they have become the de facto standard of care.

KEYWORDS:

Chelation; Heart; Iron; Iron overload; Liver; Magnetic resonance imaging; Sickle cell disease; Thalassemia

PMID:
25064711
PMCID:
PMC4115249
DOI:
10.1016/j.hoc.2014.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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