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Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2014 Sep;16(9):464. doi: 10.1007/s11920-014-0464-x.

Disaster media coverage and psychological outcomes: descriptive findings in the extant research.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 26901 - WP3217, Oklahoma City, OK, 73126, USA, Betty-Pfefferbaum@ouhsc.edu.

Abstract

This review of the literature on disaster media coverage describes the events, samples, and forms of media coverage (television, newspapers, radio, internet) studied and examines the association between media consumption and psychological outcomes. A total of 36 studies representing both man-made and natural events met criteria for review in this analysis. Most studies examined disaster television viewing in the context of terrorism and explored a range of outcomes including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caseness and posttraumatic stress (PTS), depression, anxiety, stress reactions, and substance use. There is good evidence establishing a relationship between disaster television viewing and various psychological outcomes, especially PTSD caseness and PTS, but studies are too few to draw definitive conclusions about the other forms of media coverage that have been examined. As media technology continues to advance, future research is needed to investigate these additional media forms especially newer forms such as social media.

PMID:
25064691
PMCID:
PMC4144190
DOI:
10.1007/s11920-014-0464-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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