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BMC Nephrol. 2014 Jul 27;15:122. doi: 10.1186/1471-2369-15-122.

Is hyperuricemia an independent risk factor for new-onset chronic kidney disease?: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on observational cohort studies.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China. fupinghx@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hyperuricemia has been reported to be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However whether an elevated serum uric acid level is an independent risk factor for new-onset CKD remained controversial.

METHODS:

A systematic review and meta-analysis using a literature search of online databases including PubMed, Embase, Ovid and ISI Web/Web of Science was conducted. Summary adjusted odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to evaluate the risk estimates of hyperuricemia for new-onset CKD.

RESULTS:

Thirteen studies containing 190,718 participants were included. A significant positive association was found between elevated serum uric acid levels and new-onset CKD at follow-up (summary OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.25). Hyperuricemia was found be an independent predictor for the development of newly diagnosed CKD in non-CKD patients (summary OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.59-3.46). This association increased with increasing length of follow-up. No significant differences were found for risk estimates of the associations between elevated serum uric acid levels and developing CKD between males and females.

CONCLUSIONS:

With long-term follow-up of non-CKD individuals, elevated serum uric acid levels showed an increased risk for the development of chronic renal dysfunction.

PMID:
25064611
PMCID:
PMC4132278
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2369-15-122
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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