Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eat Behav. 2014 Aug;15(3):505-8. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.06.009. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

Problematic intake of high-sugar/low-fat and high glycemic index foods by bariatric patients is associated with development of post-surgical new onset substance use disorders.

Author information

1
Eastern Michigan University, Psychology Department, Ypsilanti, MI, United States; George Washington University, Psychology Department, Washington, DC, United States. Electronic address: lfowler@gwmail.gwu.edu.
2
Eastern Michigan University, Psychology Department, Ypsilanti, MI, United States; Yale University School of Medicine, Psychiatry Department, New Haven, CT, United States.
3
Eastern Michigan University, Psychology Department, Ypsilanti, MI, United States.

Abstract

Bariatric or weight loss surgery (WLS) patients are overrepresented in substance abuse treatment, constituting about 3% of admissions; about 2/3 of such patients deny problematic substance use prior to WLS. It is important to advance our understanding of the emergence of substance use disorders (SUDs) - particularly the New Onset variant - after WLS. Burgeoning research with both animal models and humans suggests that "food addiction" may play a role in certain forms of obesity, with particular risk conferred by foods high in sugar but low in fat. Therefore, we hypothesized that WLS patients who reported pre-WLS problems with High-Sugar/Low-Fat foods and those high on the glycemic index (GI) would be those most likely to evidence New Onset SUDs after surgery. Secondary data analyses were conducted using a de-identified database from 154 bariatric surgery patients (88% female, Mage=48.7 yrs, SD=10.8, Mtime since surgery=2.7 yrs, SD=2.2 yrs). Participants who endorsed pre-surgical problems with High-Sugar/Low-Fat foods and High GI foods were at greater risk for New Onset SUD in the post-surgical period. These findings remained significant after controlling for other predictors of post-surgical SUD. Our findings provide evidence for the possibility of addiction transfer among certain bariatric patients.

KEYWORDS:

Addiction transfer; Bariatric surgery; Food addiction; Obesity; Substance abuse; Weight loss surgery

PMID:
25064307
DOI:
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.06.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center