Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eat Behav. 2014 Aug;15(3):464-77. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.06.001. Epub 2014 Jun 19.

A systematic review of family caregiving in eating disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Biological and Health Psychology, School of Psychology, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: dimi.anastasiadou@gmail.com.
2
Department of Biological and Health Psychology, School of Psychology, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: cristina.medina.pradas@gmail.com.
3
Department of Biological and Health Psychology, School of Psychology, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: anarosa.sepulveda@uam.es.
4
FRCP, FRCPsych, Section of Eating Disorders, King's College of London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK. Electronic address: janet.treasure@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

The objective of the study was to review systematically the available new evidence on family caregiving in eating disorders (ED), updating the study of Zabala, Macdonald, and Treasure (2009). Electronic databases were searched from October 2008 until May 2013. Selected studies included carers of people with ED and employed one or more measures of caregiving experience, accommodation and enabling behaviours, expressed emotion, and/or psychological distress. Twenty-nine studies were identified. Most of the studies examined these features in mothers of patients with anorexia. Only a few studies included a control group. The majority of studies found high levels of negative aspects of caregiving, accommodation and enabling behaviours, expressed emotion and psychological distress in carers of people with ED, although positive aspects and emotions were also reported. These features varied depending on some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of carers and patients; moreover, interesting preliminary cultural and gender differences emerged. Progress has been made in research on family caregiving in ED and there is evidence that these factors can be associated with the outcome of ED. Theoretical, research and clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Caregiver; Distress; Eating disorders; Expressed emotion; Systematic review

PMID:
25064301
DOI:
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center