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Eat Behav. 2014 Aug;15(3):379-82. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.04.004. Epub 2014 May 10.

Dietary intake modification in response to a participation in a resistance training program for sedentary older adults with prediabetes: findings from the Resist Diabetes study.

Author information

1
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: tanyamh@vt.edu.
2
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: bdavy@vt.edu.
3
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: aeginter@vt.edu.
4
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: mebaugh@vt.edu.
5
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: vhedrick@vt.edu.
6
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: emarinik@vt.edu.
7
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: bhealthy@vt.edu.
8
Department of Human Development, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: jsavla@vt.edu.
9
PCR, Inc., Blacksburg, VA 24060, United States. Electronic address: winettsg@gmail.com.
10
Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, United States. Electronic address: rswinett@vt.edu.

Abstract

Engagement in one type of health behavior change may exert a "spillover" effect resulting in other behavior changes. Few studies have examined dietary intake following prolonged training, and none have evaluated spontaneous dietary changes beyond alterations in energy or macronutrient intake following initiation of strength/resistance training (RT). The purpose of this observational investigation was to determine if spontaneous dietary intake modifications occur in response to initiation of an RT program, among older adults. Previously sedentary adults with prediabetes (n=134, age=59±1 years) were enrolled in a supervised 12-week RT program. Participants were not given dietary advice or encouraged to change eating behaviors. Three non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recalls were collected at baseline and after 12 weeks of RT. Reductions in intake of energy (1914±40 kcal vs. 1834±427 kcal, p=0.010), carbohydrate (211.6±4.9 g vs. 201.7±5.2 g, p=0.015), total sugar (87.4±2.7 g vs. 81.5±3.1 g, p=0.030), glycemic load (113.4±3.0 vs. 108.1±3.2, p=0.031), fruits and vegetables (4.6±0.2 servings vs. 4.1±0.2 servings, p=0.018), and sweets and desserts (1.1±0.07 servings vs. 0.89±0.07 servings, p=0.023) were detected over time. No changes in other dietary intake variables were observed. Mode of exercise and disease state may be important factors in determining whether dietary modifications occur with exercise initiation, among previously sedentary adults. Successful initiation of RT may represent an opportunity for health care professionals to promote beneficial changes in dietary habits, among older adults with prediabetes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01112709.

KEYWORDS:

Behavior change; Dietary modification; Prediabetes; Resistance training

PMID:
25064285
PMCID:
PMC4115251
DOI:
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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