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FASEB J. 2014 Oct;28(10):4563-70. doi: 10.1096/fj.14-254748. Epub 2014 Jul 25.

Sensitivity and specificity of the empirical lymphocyte genome sensitivity (LGS) assay: implications for improving cancer diagnostics.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences and d.anderson1@bradford.ac.uk.
2
School of Life Sciences and.
3
School of Health Studies, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK;
4
Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK; and.
5
Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, UK.

Abstract

Lymphocyte responses from 208 individuals: 20 with melanoma, 34 with colon cancer, and 4 with lung cancer (58), 18 with suspected melanoma, 28 with polyposis, and 10 with COPD (56), and 94 healthy volunteers were examined. The natural logarithm of the Olive tail moment (OTM) was plotted for exposure to UVA through 5 different agar depths (100 cell measurements/depth) and analyzed using a repeated measures regression model. Responses of patients with cancer plateaued after treatment with different UVA intensities, but returned toward control values for healthy volunteers. For precancerous conditions and suspected cancers, intermediate responses occurred. ROC analysis of mean log OTMs, for cancers plus precancerous/suspect conditions vs. controls, cancer vs. precancerous/suspect conditions plus controls, and cancer vs. controls, gave areas under the curve of 0.87, 0.89, and 0.93, respectively (P<0.001). Optimization allowed test sensitivity or specificity to approach 100% with acceptable complementary measures. This modified comet assay could represent a stand-alone test or an adjunct to other investigative procedures for detecting cancer.

KEYWORDS:

blood test; susceptibility

PMID:
25063845
DOI:
10.1096/fj.14-254748
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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