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J Ultrasound Med. 2014 Aug;33(8):1401-6. doi: 10.7863/ultra.33.8.1401.

Cardiac sonography by the neonatologist: clinical usefulness and educational perspective.

Author information

1
Monash Newborn, Monash Medical Center (A.S., S.M.), and Monash University (A.S.), Clayton, Victoria, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Women and Babies Hospital and University of Sydney, Sydney New South Wales, Australia (N.E.); and Division of Neonatology and Physiology and Experimental Medicine Program, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (P.J.M.). arvind.sehgal@southernhealth.org.au.
2
Monash Newborn, Monash Medical Center (A.S., S.M.), and Monash University (A.S.), Clayton, Victoria, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Women and Babies Hospital and University of Sydney, Sydney New South Wales, Australia (N.E.); and Division of Neonatology and Physiology and Experimental Medicine Program, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (P.J.M.).

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Clinicians are increasingly using cardiac sonography in clinical practice. The objectives of this study were to assess the current state of clinician-performed cardiac sonography practice in the Australia-New Zealand region, with particular reference to the scope of clinical practice and type of training offered.

METHODS:

A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted, and an electronic Web-based questionnaire was e-mailed to neonatologists and advanced trainees in the region. Information was collected on respondents (demographics, clinician-performed cardiac sonography experience, and opinions), equipment use, and training frameworks. Main outcome measures ascertained were clinical use and educational perspectives.

RESULTS:

The overall survey response rate was 64% (113 of 176). Eighty-five percent of respondents reported that clinician-performed cardiac sonography was performed in their units, most commonly to use the physiologic information obtained in conjunction with clinical information to refine decision making. The most common clinical indication was evaluation of a hemodynamically relevant ductus arteriosus. A dedicated echocardiographic machine was available to 80% of respondents. Most respondents reported "self-directed" learning as the most common method of training. More than 85% of respondents reported having access to either on-site or off-site pediatric cardiology services.

CONCLUSIONS:

Widespread availability and use of clinician-performed cardiac sonography in units across the Australia-New Zealand region was noted. The need for a structured training program was identified.

KEYWORDS:

cardiac sonography; neonatologist; point-of-care ultrasound; survey

PMID:
25063405
DOI:
10.7863/ultra.33.8.1401
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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