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Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2014 Sep;42:734-45. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2014.06.008. Epub 2014 Jun 19.

Prodigiosin release from an implantable biomedical device: kinetics of localized cancer drug release.

Author information

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria.
2
Department of Theoretical Physics, African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria.
3
Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria.
4
Department of Chemistry, Bronx Community College, New York, NY, USA.
5
Department of Chemistry, Bronx Community College, New York, NY, USA; Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.
6
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria; Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 1 Olden Street, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. Electronic address: soboyejo@princeton.edu.

Abstract

This paper presents an implantable encapsulated structure that can deliver localized heating (hyperthermia) and controlled concentrations of prodigiosin (a cancer drug) synthesized by bacteria (Serratia marcesce (subsp. marcescens)). Prototypical Poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) packages, containing well-controlled micro-channels and drug storage compartments, were fabricated along with a drug-storing polymer produced by free radical polymerization of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPA) co-monomers of Acrylamide (AM) and Butyl-methacrylate (BMA). The mechanisms of drug diffusion of PNIPA-base gels were elucidated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was also used to study the heterogeneous porous structure of the PNIPA-based gels. The release exponents, n, of the gels were found to between 0.5 and 0.7. This is in the range expected for Fickian (n=0.5). Deviation from Fickian diffusion was also observed (n>0.5) diffusion. The gel diffusion coefficients were shown to vary between 2.1×10(-12)m(2)/s and 4.8×10(-6)m(2)/s. The implications of the results are then discussed for the localized treatment of cancer via hyperthermia and the controlled delivery of prodigiosin from encapsulated PNIPA-based devices.

KEYWORDS:

Biomedical device; Breast cancer; Hyperthermia; Localized chemotherapy; Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide)-based hydrogels; Prodigiosin

PMID:
25063175
DOI:
10.1016/j.msec.2014.06.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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