Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Huntingtons Dis. 2014;3(2):189-95. doi: 10.3233/JHD-140102.

A pilot study of virtual visits in Huntington disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
2
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
3
Duke University School of Medicine University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
4
Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Virtual visits through web-based video conferencing can increase access to specialty care for individuals with Huntington disease (HD) and facilitate research participation.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the feasibility of conducting virtual visits directly into the homes of individuals with HD, to assess the reliability of conducting remote versus in-person motor assessments, and to determine the test-retest reliability of conducting motor assessments remotely.

METHODS:

Individuals with mild to moderate HD underwent baseline in-person clinic assessments and completed a HD care survey. Participants were randomized to receive three virtual visits from one of two physicians over four months that included a modified Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale motor examination (excluding rigidity and balance assessments) via web-based video conferencing. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to determine the level of agreement between remote and in-person assessments. Participants also completed a survey on their interest in telemedicine.

RESULTS:

Thirteen individuals underwent baseline assessments, eleven (85%) participants completed at least one virtual visit, and 27 (82%) of 33 total virtual visits were completed. Remote motor scores demonstrated good reliability (ICC = 0.78; n = 11) compared to in-person motor scores. Test-retest reliability of motor scores conducted remotely was excellent (ICC = 0.90; n = 11). Participants expressed moderate future interest in using virtual visits to participate in research and to receive care.

CONCLUSION:

In this pilot study, virtual visits into the home were feasible and reliable for conducting motor assessments in HD. Larger scale studies need to confirm and generalize these findings to a broader population of participants.

KEYWORDS:

Huntington disease; Telehealth; feasibility; reliability; remote assessment

PMID:
25062861
DOI:
10.3233/JHD-140102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for IOS Press
Loading ...
Support Center