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Int J Nurs Stud. 2015 Jan;52(1):39-48. doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.06.013. Epub 2014 Jul 5.

Screening and brief intervention delivery in the workplace to reduce alcohol-related harm: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Glasgow Caledonian University, United Kingdom.
2
University of York, United Kingdom.
3
University of the West of Scotland, United Kingdom.
4
School of Health in Social Science, The University of Edinburgh, Doorway 6, Medical Quad, Teviot Place, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Aisha.Holloway@ed.ac.uk.

Abstract

AIM:

To explore the feasibility and cost effectiveness of screening and delivery of a brief intervention for hazardous drinking employees.

METHODS:

A pilot randomised controlled trial of a brief intervention delivered by an Occupational Health nurse versus no delivery of brief intervention (control group) conducted in a Local Authority Council (LCA) in the United Kingdom. Changes in quality of life and economic indicators were measured by the EQ-5D.

RESULTS:

627 employees were screened of whom 163 (26.01%) fulfilled the inclusion criteria with a total of 57 (35%) agreeing to participate. No significant differences were found between the groups for baseline demographics or levels/patterns of alcohol consumption. A statistically significant effect was found in the mean AUDIT scores over time (F=8.96, p=0.004) but not for group (F=0.017, p=0.896), and no significant interaction was found (F=0.148, p=0.702). The cost of each intervention was calculated at £12.48, the difference in service costs was calculated at £344.50 per person; that is there was a net saving of health and other care costs in the intervention group compared to the control group. The QALYs fell in both intervention and control groups, the difference -0.002-(-0.010) yields a net advantage of the intervention of 0.008 QALYs.

CONCLUSION:

The main results from this pilot study suggest that alcohol brief interventions delivered in the workplace may offer the potential to reduce alcohol-related harm and save public sector resources. A fully powered multi-centre trial is warranted to contribute to the current evidence base and explore further the potential of alcohol brief interventions in the workplace. In a full trial the recruitment method may need to be re-considered.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol consumption; Brief interventions; Feasibility; Pilot study: Randomised controlled trial; Screening; Work place

PMID:
25062806
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.06.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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