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Nat Commun. 2014 Jul 25;5:4523. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5523.

Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer.

Author information

1
1] Responsive Organic Materials Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan [2] State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201600, China.
2
1] Responsive Organic Materials Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan [2] Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.
3
Responsive Organic Materials Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.
4
1] Responsive Organic Materials Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan [2] Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502, Japan.
5
RNC Nuclear Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.
6
Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan.
7
Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502, Japan.
8
1] Responsive Organic Materials Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan [2] Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, 128 Academic Road, Sec. 2, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan.

Abstract

Although electrically stimulated neurite outgrowth on bioelectronic devices is a promising means of nerve regeneration, immunogenic scar formation can insulate electrodes from targeted cells and tissues, thereby reducing the lifetime of the device. Ideally, an electrode material capable of electrically interfacing with neurons selectively and efficiently would be integrated without being recognized by the immune system and minimize its response. Here we develop a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer possessing several attractive features. This polymer displays high resistance towards nonspecific enzyme/cell binding and recognizes targeted cells specifically to allow intimate electrical communication over long periods of time. Its low electrical impedance relays electrical signals efficiently. This material is capable to integrate biochemical and electrical stimulation to promote neural cellular behaviour. Neurite outgrowth is enhanced greatly on this new conducting polymer; in addition, electrically stimulated secretion of proteins from primary Schwann cells can also occur on it.

PMID:
25060339
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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