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Cortex. 2014 Sep;58:217-38. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2014.05.013. Epub 2014 Jun 21.

When concepts lose their color: a case of object-color knowledge impairment.

Author information

1
Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, USA.
2
Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, USA; Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Unity Hospital, Rochester, USA.
4
Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, USA; Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, USA. Electronic address: mahon@rcbi.rochester.edu.

Abstract

Color is important in our daily interactions with objects, and plays a role in both low- and high-level visual processing. Previous neuropsychological studies have shown that color perception and object-color knowledge can doubly dissociate, and that both can dissociate from processing of object form. We present a case study of an individual who displayed an impairment for knowledge of the typical colors of objects, with preserved color perception and color naming. Our case also presented with a pattern of, if anything, worse performance for naming living items compared to non-living things. The findings of the experimental investigation are evaluated in light of two theories of conceptual organization in the brain: the Sensory/Functional Theory and the Domain-Specific Hypothesis. The dissociations observed in this case compel a model in which sensory/motor modality and semantic domain jointly constrain the organization of object knowledge.

KEYWORDS:

Conceptual knowledge; Domain-specific; Modality-specific; Object-color knowledge; Semantic memory

PMID:
25058612
PMCID:
PMC4135534
DOI:
10.1016/j.cortex.2014.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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