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Nat Commun. 2014 Jul 23;5:4448. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5448.

An infectious bat-derived chimeric influenza virus harbouring the entry machinery of an influenza A virus.

Author information

1
1] Institute of Virology, Center for Microbiology and Hygiene, University Medical Center Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Street 11, 79104 Freiburg, Germany [2].
2
1] Institute of Virology, Center for Microbiology and Hygiene, University Medical Center Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Street 11, 79104 Freiburg, Germany [2] Spemann Graduate School of Biology and Medicine, University of Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany [3] Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany [4].
3
1] Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA [2] Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA.
4
1] Institute of Virology, Center for Microbiology and Hygiene, University Medical Center Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Street 11, 79104 Freiburg, Germany [2] Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany.
5
Institute of Virology, Center for Microbiology and Hygiene, University Medical Center Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Street 11, 79104 Freiburg, Germany.
6
Institute of Diagnostic Virology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute, 17493 Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany.
7
Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI), 3147 Mittelhäusern, Switzerland.
8
1] Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA [2] Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA [3] Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA.

Abstract

In 2012, the complete genomic sequence of a new and potentially harmful influenza A-like virus from bats (H17N10) was identified. However, infectious influenza virus was neither isolated from infected bats nor reconstituted, impeding further characterization of this virus. Here we show the generation of an infectious chimeric virus containing six out of the eight bat virus genes, with the remaining two genes encoding the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins of a prototypic influenza A virus. This engineered virus replicates well in a broad range of mammalian cell cultures, human primary airway epithelial cells and mice, but poorly in avian cells and chicken embryos without further adaptation. Importantly, the bat chimeric virus is unable to reassort with other influenza A viruses. Although our data do not exclude the possibility of zoonotic transmission of bat influenza viruses into the human population, they indicate that multiple barriers exist that makes this an unlikely event.

PMID:
25055345
PMCID:
PMC5533278
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5448
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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