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PLoS One. 2014 Jul 23;9(7):e102953. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0102953. eCollection 2014.

Survival analysis, long-term outcomes, and percentage of recovery up to 8 years post-infection among the Houston West Nile virus cohort.

Author information

1
Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, National School of Tropical Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
2
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
3
Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
4
City of Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
5
Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center, Houston, Texas, United States of America.

Abstract

In 2012, we witnessed a resurgence of West Nile virus (WNV) in the United States, with the largest outbreak of human cases reported since 2003. WNV is now endemic and will continue to produce epidemics over time, therefore defining the long-term consequences of WNV infection is critical. Over a period of eight years, we prospectively followed a cohort of 157 WNV-infected subjects in the Houston metropolitan area to observe recovery over time and define the long-term clinical outcomes. We used survival analysis techniques to determine percentage of recovery over time and the effects of demographic and co-morbid conditions on recovery. We found that 40% of study participants continued to experience symptoms related to their WNV infection up to 8 years later. Having a clinical presentation of encephalitis and being over age 50 were significantly associated with prolonged or poor recovery over time. Since the health and economic impact as a result of prolonged recovery, continued morbidity, and related disability is likely substantial in those infected with WNV, future research should be aimed at developing effective vaccines to prevent illness and novel therapeutics to minimize morbidity, mortality, and long-term complications from infection.

PMID:
25054656
PMCID:
PMC4108377
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0102953
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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