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Scand J Surg. 2015 Mar;104(1):10-7. doi: 10.1177/1457496914543977. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Psychological characteristics, eating behavior, and quality of life assessment of obese patients undergoing weight loss interventions.

Author information

1
Section of Investigative Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK a.miras@nhs.net.
2
Metabolic Medicine Research Unit, Imperial College London, Charing Cross Hospital, London, UK.
3
Metabolic Medicine Research Unit, Imperial College London, Charing Cross Hospital, London, UK Diabetes Complications Research Centre, UCD Conway Institute, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
4
Section of Investigative Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity. However, not all patients have similar weight loss following surgery and many researchers have attributed this to different pre-operative psychological, eating behavior, or quality-of-life factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any differences in these factors between patients electing to have bariatric surgery compared to less invasive non-surgical weight loss treatments, between patients choosing a particular bariatric surgery procedure, and to identify whether these factors predict weight loss after bariatric surgery.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

This was a prospective study of 90 patients undergoing gastric bypass, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, or adjustable gastric banding and 36 patients undergoing pharmacotherapy or lifestyle interventions. All patients completed seven multi-factorial psychological, eating behavior, and quality-of-life questionnaires prior to choosing their weight loss treatment. Questionnaire scores, baseline body mass index, and percent weight loss at 1 year after surgical interventions were recorded.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Surgical patients were younger, had a higher body mass index, and obesity had a higher impact on their quality of life than on non-surgical patients, but they did not differ in the majority of eating behavior and psychological parameters studied. Patients opting for adjustable gastric banding surgery were more anxious, depressed, and had more problems with energy levels than those choosing vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and more work problems compared to those undergoing gastric bypass. Weight loss after bariatric surgery was predicted by pre-operative scores of dietary restraint, disinhibition, and pre-surgery energy levels. The results of this study generate a number of hypotheses that can be explored in future studies and accelerate the development of personalized weight loss treatments.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric surgery; eating behavior; gastric banding; gastric bypass; predictors of weight loss; psychological factors; quality of life; vertical sleeve gastrectomy

PMID:
25053582
DOI:
10.1177/1457496914543977
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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