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J Gen Virol. 2014 Nov;95(Pt 11):2365-71. doi: 10.1099/vir.0.067488-0. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Neuraminidase gene homology contributes to the protective activity of influenza vaccines prepared from the influenza virus library.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Ibaraki, Osaka, Japan Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University (BIKEN), Kagawa, Japan mahmad@mail.biken.or.jp.
2
Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Ibaraki, Osaka, Japan.
3
Laboratory of Microbiology, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
4
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Technology and Science, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan.
5
Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Ibaraki, Osaka, Japan Division of Clinical Virology, Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.
6
Laboratory of Microbiology, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
7
Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Ibaraki, Osaka, Japan Department of Laboratory Sciences, Division of Health Sciences, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Japan.
8
Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University (BIKEN), Kagawa, Japan.
9
Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Ibaraki, Osaka, Japan Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University (BIKEN), Kagawa, Japan.

Abstract

Whole-virus (WV) vaccines from influenza A/duck/Hokkaido/77 (H3N2), and its reassortant strains H3N4, H3N5 and H3N7, which have the same haemagglutinin (HA) gene but different neuraminidase (NA) genes, were prepared from our influenza virus library. Mice were intranasally immunized with equivalent doses of each vaccine (1-0.01 µg per mouse). All of the mice that received the highest dose of each vaccine (1 µg per mouse) showed equivalent high HA-inhibiting (HI) antibody titres and survived the H3N2 challenge viruses. However, mice that received lower doses of vaccine (0.1 or 0.01 µg per mouse) containing a heterologous NA had lower survival rates than those given the H3N2-based vaccine. The lungs of mice challenged with H3N2 virus showed a significantly higher virus clearance rate when the vaccine contained the homologous NA (N2) versus a heterologous NA, suggesting that NA contributed to the protection, especially when the HI antibody level was low. These results suggested that, even if vaccines prepared for a possible upcoming pandemic do not induce sufficient HI antibodies, WV vaccines can still be effective through other matched proteins such as NA.

PMID:
25053564
DOI:
10.1099/vir.0.067488-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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