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J Oncol Pract. 2014 Sep;10(5):e328-34. doi: 10.1200/JOP.2014.001464. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Diversity by race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex of the United States medical oncology physician workforce over the past quarter century.

Author information

1
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; and Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR deville@uphs.upenn.edu.
2
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; and Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the medical oncology (MO) physician workforce diversity by race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex, with attention to trainees.

METHODS:

Public registries were used to assess 2010 differences among MO practicing physicians, academic faculty, and fellows; internal medicine (IM) residents; and the US population, using binomial tests with P < .001 significance adjusting for multiple comparisons. Significant changes in fellow representation from 1986 to 2011 were assessed.

RESULTS:

Female representation as MO fellows (45.0%) was significantly increased compared with faculty (22.4%) and practicing physicians (27.4%); was no different than IM residents (44.7%, P = .853); and increased significantly, by 1.0% per year. Women were significantly underrepresented as practicing physicians, faculty, and fellows compared with the US population (50.8%). Traditionally underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM) were significantly underrepresented as practicing physicians (7.8%), faculty (5.7%), and fellows (10.9%), versus US population (30.0%). Hispanic MO fellows (7.5%) were increased compared with faculty (3.9%) and practicing physicians (4.1%); Black fellows (3.1%) were no different than faculty (1.8%, P = .0283) or practicing physicians (3.5%, P = .443). When comparing MO fellows versus IM residents, there were no differences for American Indians/Alaska Natives/Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (0.3%, 0.6%, respectively, P = .137) and Hispanics (7.5%, 8.7%, P = .139), unlike Blacks (3.1%, 5.6%, P < .001). There has been no significant change in URM representation, with negligible changes every 5 years for American Indians/Alaska Natives/Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (-0.1%), Blacks (-0.3%), and Hispanics (0.3%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Female fellow representation increased 1% per year over the quarter century indicating historical gains, whereas URM diversity remains unchanged. For Blacks alone, representation as MO fellows is decreased compared with IM residents, suggesting greater disparity in MO training.

PMID:
25052501
DOI:
10.1200/JOP.2014.001464
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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