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Microb Ecol. 2015 Jan;69(1):59-65. doi: 10.1007/s00248-014-0466-6. Epub 2014 Jul 23.

Isolation, characterization and community diversity of indigenous putative toluene-degrading bacterial populations with catechol-2,3-dioxygenase genes in contaminated soils.

Author information

1
Department of Biology and the Center for Sustainability and the Environment, Albion College, 611 East Porter Street, Albion, MI, 49224, USA, OOlapade@albion.edu.

Abstract

Indigenous bacterial assemblages with putative hydrocarbon-degrading capabilities were isolated, characterized and screened for the presence of the catechol-2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) gene after exposure to toluene in two different (i.e., pristine and conditioned) soil communities. The indigenous bacterial populations were exposed to the hydrocarbon substrate by the addition of toluene concentrations, ranging from 0.5 % to 10 % V/W in 10 g of each soil and incubated at 30 °C for upwards of 12 days. In total, 25 isolates (11 in pristine soil and 14 in conditioned soil) were phenotypically characterized according to standard microbiological methods and also screened for the 238-bp C23O gene fragment. Additionally, 16S rRNA analysis of the isolates identified some of them as belonging to the genera Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas. Furthermore, the two clone libraries that were constructed from these toluene-contaminated soils also revealed somewhat disparate phylotypes (i.e., 70 % Actinobacteria and Firmicutes to 30 % Proteobacteria in conditioned soil, whereas in pristine soil: 66 % Actinobacteria and Firmicutes; 21 % Proteobacteria and 13 % Bacteroidetes). The differences observed in bacterial phylotypes between these two soil communities may probably be associated with previous exposure to hydrocarbon sources by indigenous populations in the conditioned soil as compared to the pristine soil.

PMID:
25052383
DOI:
10.1007/s00248-014-0466-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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