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Curr Opin Virol. 2014 Aug;7:101-7. doi: 10.1016/j.coviro.2014.06.005. Epub 2014 Jul 19.

Glycan-dependent viral infection in infants and the role of human milk oligosaccharides.

Author information

1
Division of Neonatology and Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, San Diego, CA 92093-0715, USA.
2
Division of Neonatology and Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, San Diego, CA 92093-0715, USA. Electronic address: lbode@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

Glycan interactions play a crucial role in the infection of rotavirus (RV), norovirus (NV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as they facilitate viral attachment to the host receptor cell. A number of cell surface glycan epitopes involved in this process have been identified, including human blood group antigens (HBGAs). These antigens are also found on human milk oligosaccharides (HMO), an abundant and structurally diverse component in human milk. Breast-fed infants seem to have a reduced risk of acquiring RV, NV and HIV infection, suggesting a potential effector function of milk oligosaccharides in viral pathogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms of HMO in viral protection and the identification of individual, structurally distinct effective HMO, needs further elucidation.

PMID:
25047751
DOI:
10.1016/j.coviro.2014.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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