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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Jan;212(1):94.e1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2014.07.023. Epub 2014 Jul 18.

Antenatal magnesium sulfate exposure and acute cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI. Electronic address: Lilia.DeJesus@UCSF.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI.
3
Statistics and Epidemiology Unit, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa School of Medicine, Iowa City, IA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH.
8
Division of Neonatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA.
11
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Antenatal magnesium (anteMg) is used for various obstetric indications including fetal neuroprotection. Infants exposed to anteMg may be at risk for respiratory depression and delivery room (DR) resuscitation. The study objective was to compare the risk of acute cardiorespiratory events among preterm infants who were and were not exposed to anteMg.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a retrospective analysis of prospective data collected in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network's Generic Database from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012. The primary outcome was DR intubation or respiratory support at birth or on day 1 of life. Secondary outcomes were invasive mechanical ventilation, hypotension treatment, neonatal morbidities, and mortality. Logistic regression analysis evaluated the risk of primary outcome after adjustment for covariates.

RESULTS:

We evaluated 1544 infants <29 weeks' gestational age (1091 in anteMg group and 453 in nonexposed group). Mothers in the anteMg group were more likely to have higher education, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and antenatal corticosteroids, while their infants were younger in gestation and weighed less (P < .05). The primary outcome (odds ratio [OR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-1.65) was similar between groups. Hypotension treatment (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.51-0.97) and invasive mechanical ventilation (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.41-0.72) were significantly less in the anteMg group.

CONCLUSION:

Among preterm infants age <29 weeks' gestation, anteMg exposure was not associated with an increase in cardiorespiratory events in the early newborn period. The safety of anteMg as measured by the need for DR intubation or respiratory support on day 1 of life was comparable between groups.

KEYWORDS:

antenatal magnesium; nasal continuous positive airway pressure; neonatal resuscitation; preterm infants

PMID:
25046806
PMCID:
PMC4275326
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2014.07.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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