Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Eat Disord. 2014 Nov;47(7):813-24. doi: 10.1002/eat.22331. Epub 2014 Jul 21.

Developmental antecedents of abnormal eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescence.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study capitalizes on developmental data from an Australian population-based birth cohort to identify developmental markers of abnormal eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescence. The aims were twofold: (1) to develop a comprehensive path model identifying infant and childhood developmental correlates of Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in adolescence, and (2) to explore potential gender differences.

METHOD:

Data were drawn from a 30-year longitudinal study that has followed the health and development of a population based cohort across 15 waves of data collection from infancy since 1983: The Australian Temperament Project. Participants in this analysis were the 1,300 youth who completed the 11th survey at 15-16 years (1998) and who completed the eating disorder inventory at this time point.

RESULTS:

Developmental correlates of Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in mid-adolescence were temperamental persistence, early gestational age, persistent high weight, teen depression, stronger peer relationships, maternal dieting behavior, and pubertal timing. Overall, these factors accounted for 28% of the variance in Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors at 15-16 years of age. Depressive symptoms, maternal dieting behavior, and early puberty were more important factors for girls. Late puberty was a more important factor for boys.

DISCUSSION:

Findings address an important gap in our understanding of the etiology of Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in adolescence and suggest multiple targets for preventive intervention.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; developmental correlates; eating attitudes and behaviors; family; longitudinal survey

PMID:
25046731
DOI:
10.1002/eat.22331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center