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Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:724134. doi: 10.1155/2014/724134. Epub 2014 Jun 19.

A rat model of thrombosis in common carotid artery induced by implantable wireless light-emitting diode device.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung-Yuan Christian University, Chung Li 32023, Taiwan ; Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, No. 5, Fu-Hsing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan.
2
Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, No. 5, Fu-Hsing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung-Yuan Christian University, Chung Li 32023, Taiwan.
4
Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou 33305, Taiwan.

Abstract

This work has developed a novel approach to form common carotid artery (CCA) thrombus in rats with a wireless implantable light-emitting diode (LED) device. The device mainly consists of an external controller and an internal LED assembly. The controller was responsible for wirelessly transmitting electrical power. The internal LED assembly served as an implant to receive the power and irradiate light on CCA. The thrombus formation was identified with animal sonography, 7 T magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic examination. The present study showed that a LED assembly implanted on the outer surface of CCA could induce acute occlusion with single irradiation with 6 mW/cm(2) LED for 4 h. If intermittent irradiation with 4.3-4.5 mW/cm(2) LED for 2 h was shut off for 30 min, then irradiation for another 2 h was applied; the thrombus was observed to grow gradually and was totally occluded at 7 days. Compared with the contralateral CCA without LED irradiation, the arterial endothelium in the LED-irradiated artery was discontinued. Our study has shown that, by adjusting the duration of irradiation and the power intensity of LED, it is possible to produce acute occlusion and progressive thrombosis, which can be used as an animal model for antithrombotic drug development.

PMID:
25045695
PMCID:
PMC4090467
DOI:
10.1155/2014/724134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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