Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Jun;11(6):593-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.04.522. Epub 2014 Jul 17.

Reactivated herpes simplex infection increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: hugo.lovheim@germed.umu.se.
2
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
3
Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
4
Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have suggested a link between herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS:

The present analysis included 3432 persons (53.9% women, mean age at inclusion 62.7 ± 14.4 years) with a mean follow-up time of 11.3 years. The number of incident AD cases was 245. Serum samples were analyzed for anti-HSV antibodies (immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

RESULTS:

The presence of anti-HSV IgG antibodies was not associated with an increased risk for AD, controlled for age and sex (hazard ratio, HR, 0.993, P = .979). However, the presence of anti-HSV IgM at baseline was associated with an increased risk of developing AD (HR 1.959, P = .012).

CONCLUSION:

Positivity for anti-HSV IgM, a sign of reactivated infection, was found to almost double the risk for AD, whereas the presence of anti-HSV IgG antibodies did not affect the risk.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Cohort study; Dementia; HSV; Herpes; Herpes simplex

PMID:
25043910
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2014.04.522
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center