Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Chir Main. 2014 Oct;33(5):325-9. doi: 10.1016/j.main.2014.06.003. Epub 2014 Jul 10.

Woodworking injuries: a comparative study of work-related and hobby-related accidents.

Author information

1
Service d'orthopédie, de traumatologie, de chirurgie plastique, reconstructrice et assistance main, CIC IT 808, EA 4268 innovation, imagerie, ingénierie et intervention en santé "I4S", IFR 133 Inserm, CHI Vesoul, CHU de Besançon, 2, boulevard Fleming, 25033 Besançon, France. Electronic address: francois_loisel@yahoo.fr.
2
Centre de Long Séjour Bellevaux, 29, quai de Strasbourg, 25000 Besançon, France.
3
Polyclinique de Franche-Comté, 4, rue Rodin, BP 2222, 25052 Besançon, France.
4
Service d'orthopédie, de traumatologie, de chirurgie plastique, reconstructrice et assistance main, CIC IT 808, EA 4268 innovation, imagerie, ingénierie et intervention en santé "I4S", IFR 133 Inserm, CHI Vesoul, CHU de Besançon, 2, boulevard Fleming, 25033 Besançon, France.

Abstract

The primary objective of this study was to describe the injury characteristics and demographics of patients injured during woodworking activities, upon their arrival to the emergency department in a regional of France where this industry is prevalent. The secondary objective was to compare patient and injury characteristics for work-related and hobby-related accidents. A cohort of 87 patients who had suffered a woodworking accident over a two-year period was evaluated; 79 were available for follow-up. The context and circumstances of the accident, nature and location of the injuries and patient demographics were recorded. Hobby-related accidents accounted for two-thirds of the accidents (51/79). Most of the injured workers were either loggers (35%) or carpenters (46%). The hand was injured in 53 cases (67%). Work-related accidents resulted in significantly more serious consequences in terms of hospital stay, work stoppage, resumption of work or retraining than hobby-related accidents. For the workplace accidents, 86% occurred on new machines; more than 25% of the machines involved in accidents at home were over 15 years. Sixty-eight per cent of workers were wearing their safety gear, while only 31% of those injured during recreational woodworking wore the appropriate gear. Several elements of prevention should be improved: information about the need to maintain the equipment, protect the worker with suitable clothing, and learn which maneuvers are considered hazardous. Safety gear should be regularly inspected in the workplace.

KEYWORDS:

Accident domestique; Accident du travail; Accidents at home; Accidents at work; Hand trauma; Prevention; Prévention; Traumatisme de la main; Travail du bois; Woodworking

PMID:
25043313
DOI:
10.1016/j.main.2014.06.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center