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Curr Biol. 2014 Aug 4;24(15):1731-6. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.075. Epub 2014 Jul 17.

Impaired associative learning with food rewards in obese women.

Author information

1
Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Section of Comparative Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
2
Section of Comparative Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
4
Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Section of Comparative Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Neurobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: ifat.levy@yale.edu.

Abstract

Obesity is a major epidemic in many parts of the world. One of the main factors contributing to obesity is overconsumption of high-fat and high-calorie food, which is driven by the rewarding properties of these types of food. Previous studies have suggested that dysfunction in reward circuits may be associated with overeating and obesity. The nature of this dysfunction, however, is still unknown. Here, we demonstrate impairment in reward-based associative learning specific to food in obese women. Normal-weight and obese participants performed an appetitive reversal learning task in which they had to learn and modify cue-reward associations. To test whether any learning deficits were specific to food reward or were more general, we used a between-subject design in which half of the participants received food reward and the other half received money reward. Our results reveal a marked difference in associative learning between normal-weight and obese women when food was used as reward. Importantly, no learning deficits were observed with money reward. Multiple regression analyses also established a robust negative association between body mass index and learning performance in the food domain in female participants. Interestingly, such impairment was not observed in obese men. These findings suggest that obesity may be linked to impaired reward-based associative learning and that this impairment may be specific to the food domain.

PMID:
25042588
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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