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Nat Commun. 2014 Jul 21;5:4459. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5459.

High-efficiency translational bypassing of non-coding nucleotides specified by mRNA structure and nascent peptide.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
2
1] Department of Physical Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Göttingen, Germany [2] Molecular and Radiation Biophysics Department, B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina, Russia, and St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Polytechnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg, Russia.
3
Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-5330, USA.
4
1] Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-5330, USA [2] School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

Abstract

The gene product 60 (gp60) of bacteriophage T4 is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain from a discontinuous reading frame as a result of bypassing of a non-coding mRNA region of 50 nucleotides by the ribosome. To identify the minimum set of signals required for bypassing, we recapitulated efficient translational bypassing in an in vitro reconstituted translation system from Escherichia coli. We find that the signals, which promote efficient and accurate bypassing, are specified by the gene 60 mRNA sequence. Systematic analysis of the mRNA suggests unexpected contributions of sequences upstream and downstream of the non-coding gap region as well as of the nascent peptide. During bypassing, ribosomes glide forward on the mRNA track in a processive way. Gliding may have a role not only for gp60 synthesis, but also during regular mRNA translation for reading frame selection during initiation or tRNA translocation during elongation.

PMID:
25041899
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5459
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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