Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
HPB (Oxford). 2014 Nov;16(11):965-71. doi: 10.1111/hpb.12255. Epub 2014 Jul 9.

Post-hepatectomy haemorrhage: a single-centre experience.

Author information

1
Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to explore the incidence and causes of intra-abdominal haemorrhage after hepatectomy, indications for re-exploration, and factors affecting occurrence.

METHODS:

Clinical data for 77 patients (0.2% of 32 856 hepatectomy patients) submitted to re-exploration for haemorrhage following hepatectomy for primary liver cancer (PLC) from 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed and analysed for postoperative complications, potential site and cause of bleeding.

RESULTS:

The median interval between hepatectomy and re-exploration was 23 h in the 77 patients (range: 1 h to 11 days). Re-exploration occurred within 24 h after hepatectomy in 64 patients (83.1%), and within 8 h in 37 patients (48.1%). The most common anatomic site of intra-abdominal haemorrhage was the cut surface of the liver (n = 51, 66.2%), followed by the perihepatic ligaments (n = 19, 24.7%), the splenic fossa (n = 7, 9.1%), the diaphragm (n = 6, 7.8%), the retroperitonium (n = 6, 7.8%), the right adrenal gland (n = 3, 3.9%), and the gallbladder bed (n = 2, 2.6%). The most common form of bleeding was oozing. Early haemorrhage (at ≤ 24 h) was most likely to occur in the form of venous bleeding or oozing from the cut surface of the liver. Rates of 5-year overall and disease-free survival in the 77 patients were 22.1% and 3.9%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Re-exploration for haemorrhage following hepatectomy for PLC is a rare event. Haemorrhage occurs predominantly at the cut parenchymal surface. Early return to the operating room is vital and perioperative survival is common in this high-risk group.

PMID:
25040621
PMCID:
PMC4487746
DOI:
10.1111/hpb.12255
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center