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J Pediatr. 2014 Oct;165(4):732-7.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.05.045. Epub 2014 Jul 16.

Health-related quality of life and physical activity in children and adolescents 2 years after an inpatient weight-loss program.

Author information

1
Department of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Germany. Electronic address: heitkamp@sport.med.tum.de.
2
Department of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Germany; Sports Center, University of Passau, Germany.
3
National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
4
Rehabilitation Clinic Schoensicht, Berchtesgaden, Germany.
5
Department of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Germany.
6
Department of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Germany; DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany; Else-Kröner-Fresenius-Zentrum, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL), body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and sedentary behavior at 24 months after an inpatient weight-loss program and to examine correlations between changes in HRQOL and BMI or physical activity.

STUDY DESIGN:

This prospective study included 707 overweight and obese individuals (mean age, 14 ± 2 years; 57% girls) participating in a 4- to 6-week inpatient weight-loss program, 381 of whom completed a 24-month follow-up. HRQOL, physical activity, sedentary behavior, and BMI were assessed at baseline, at discharge, and at 6, 12, and 24 months after starting therapy. Longitudinal analyses were conducted using repeated-measures mixed models, adjusted for age, sex, and baseline outcome and accounting for attrition over time.

RESULTS:

All variables improved over treatment and 6-month follow-up (P < .05). At 24 months, overall HRQOL indicated improvements relative to baseline (3 points on a scale of 0-100; 95% CI, 1.68-4.47; P < .001). Of the 6 HRQOL domains, the greatest improvement was observed for self-esteem (11 points; 95% CI, 8.40-13.14; P < .001). BMI was 0.5 kg/m(2) lower than at baseline (95% CI, -0.92 to -0.02; P = .04). Long-term changes in physical activity explained 30% of the variation in overall HRQOL (P = .01), and change in BMI was not associated with a change in HRQOL.

CONCLUSIONS:

This inpatient weight-loss program was associated with positive changes in HRQOL over the long term, with particular improvements in self-esteem. The results indicate the potential role of physical activity in improving HRQOL without a substantial change in body composition.

PMID:
25039048
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.05.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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