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Carbohydr Polym. 2014 Oct 13;111:722-8. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.04.097. Epub 2014 May 6.

Evolution of morphology of bacterial cellulose scaffolds during early culture.

Author information

1
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072, PR China.
2
School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang 330013, Jiangxi, PR China.
3
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072, PR China. Electronic address: hlluo@tju.edu.cn.

Abstract

Morphological characteristics of a fibrous tissue engineering (TE) scaffold are key parameters affecting cell behavior. However, no study regarding the evolution of morphology of bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffolds during the culture process has been reported to date. In this work, BC scaffolds cultured for different times starting from 0.5h were characterized. The results demonstrated that the formation of an integrated scaffold and its 3D network structure, porosity, fiber diameter, light transmittance, and the morphology of hydroxyapatite (HAp)-deposited BC scaffolds changed with culture time. However, the surface and crystal structure of BC fibers did not change with culture time and no difference was found in the crystal structure of HAp deposited on BC templates regardless of BC culture time. The findings presented herein suggest that proper selection of culture time can potentially enhance the biological function of BC TE scaffold by optimizing its morphological characteristics.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial cellulose; Hydroxyapatite; Morphology; Tissue engineering scaffold

PMID:
25037408
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.04.097
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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