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J Clin Neurosci. 2014 Nov;21(11):1928-33. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.03.026. Epub 2014 Jul 15.

Impact of the number of metastatic brain lesions on survival after Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, JFK New Jersey Neuroscience Institute, Seton Hall University, 65 James Street, Edison, NJ 08820, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA. Electronic address: AsifBashirMD@gmail.com.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, JFK New Jersey Neuroscience Institute, Seton Hall University, 65 James Street, Edison, NJ 08820, USA.
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.

Abstract

Effectiveness of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS: Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for patients with metastatic brain disease and the prognostic factors influencing their survival were analyzed in a 5 year retrospective data analysis (July 2001 to June 2006). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed using univariate and multivariate analyses with the respective salient prognostic factors. This study analyzed data on 330 patients with brain metastases who underwent GKRS. Lung carcinoma (55%) was the most common primary cancer followed by breast (17.8%), melanoma (9.4%), colorectal (4.8%) and renal (3.9%). The median survival for all patients was 8 months. Survival ranged from 13 months for breast metastases, 10 months for renal, and 8 months for lung to 5 months for colorectal and melanoma. Mean age of patients was 58.5 years (range 18-81). Melanoma patients were younger with a mean age of 49 and also had the highest number of lesions (3.8) when compared to patients with renal (2.5), lung (2.8), colorectal (3) and breast (3.6). When stratified according to the number of lesions patient survival was 8 months (one to three lesions), 7.5 months (four or five lesions) and 7 months (six lesions or more). Mean Karnofsky Performance Status score (KPS) was 77 and survival dropped significantly from 8 months to 4.5 months if KPS was less than 70. Survival improved with a KPS of 70 or more, regardless of the number of lesions treated. Selection of patients based on the number of lesions may not be justified. A prospective trial is required to further define the prognostic factors affecting survival.

KEYWORDS:

Brain tumors; Cancer; Gamma Knife; Metastasis; Number of lesions; Radiosurgery; Survival

PMID:
25037311
DOI:
10.1016/j.jocn.2014.03.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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