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Cell. 2014 Jul 17;158(2):300-313. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.04.050.

Crosstalk between muscularis macrophages and enteric neurons regulates gastrointestinal motility.

Author information

1
Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State University College of Medicine and Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA.
4
Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA.
5
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA.
6
Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
7
Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.
8
The Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA.
9
Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA.
10
Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address: miriam.merad@mssm.edu.
11
Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; The Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State University College of Medicine and Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. Electronic address: mbogunovich@hmc.psu.edu.

Erratum in

  • Cell. 2014 Aug 28;158(5):1210. Dosage error in article text.

Abstract

Intestinal peristalsis is a dynamic physiologic process influenced by dietary and microbial changes. It is tightly regulated by complex cellular interactions; however, our understanding of these controls is incomplete. A distinct population of macrophages is distributed in the intestinal muscularis externa. We demonstrate that, in the steady state, muscularis macrophages regulate peristaltic activity of the colon. They change the pattern of smooth muscle contractions by secreting bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), which activates BMP receptor (BMPR) expressed by enteric neurons. Enteric neurons, in turn, secrete colony stimulatory factor 1 (CSF1), a growth factor required for macrophage development. Finally, stimuli from microbial commensals regulate BMP2 expression by macrophages and CSF1 expression by enteric neurons. Our findings identify a plastic, microbiota-driven crosstalk between muscularis macrophages and enteric neurons that controls gastrointestinal motility. PAPERFLICK.

PMID:
25036630
PMCID:
PMC4149228
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.04.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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