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Cell. 2014 Jul 17;158(2):250-262. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.037.

Conducting a microbiome study.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA; Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
2
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011, USA; Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA.
4
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA; BioFrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
5
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA; Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Electronic address: rel222@cornell.edu.

Abstract

Human microbiome research is an actively developing area of inquiry, with ramifications for our lifestyles, our interactions with microbes, and how we treat disease. Advances depend on carefully executed, controlled, and reproducible studies. Here, we provide a Primer for researchers from diverse disciplines interested in conducting microbiome research. We discuss factors to be considered in the design, execution, and data analysis of microbiome studies. These recommendations should help researchers to enter and contribute to this rapidly developing field.

PMID:
25036628
PMCID:
PMC5074386
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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