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Nephron Exp Nephrol. 2014;126(4):191-5. doi: 10.1159/000363300. Epub 2014 Jul 12.

Recent advances in animal models of diabetic nephropathy.

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1
Centres for Inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Abstract

Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the single most common cause of end-stage kidney disease. Therefore, it is imperative that novel therapies are developed. Progress has been hindered, however, by the lack of robust animal models. In the current review we describe recent advances in the field, including the impact of background strain, hypertension and transcriptomic profiling. While the C57BL/6J strain is relatively resistant to DN, the FVB strain appears more susceptible and Ove26 and db/db mice on this background may be useful in modelling types 1 and 2 DN, respectively. Black and tan, brachyury (BTBR) mice deficient for the leptin receptor (ob/ob) develop many of the pathological features of human DN and, remarkably, treatment with exogenous leptin ameliorates hyperglycaemia, albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis. Hypertension plays a key role in the progression of human DN and exacerbates nephropathy in diabetic rodents. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase deficiency (eNOS(-/-)) results in moderate hypertension and the development of nodular glomerulosclerosis and hyaline arteriosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice. In Cyp1a1mRen2 rats, renin-dependent hypertension synergises with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycaemia to produce a 500-fold increase in albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Renal transcriptional profiling suggests that many of the gene expression changes observed in human DN are replicated in eNOS(-/-) mice and Cyp1a1mRen2 rats. Despite these advances, no model faithfully recapitulates all the features of human DN and further refinements are required. In the interim, it is likely that researchers may use publically available transcriptomic data to select the most appropriate model to study their molecule or pathway of interest.

PMID:
25034792
DOI:
10.1159/000363300
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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