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Eur Respir J. 2014 Oct;44(4):994-1001. doi: 10.1183/09031936.00017114. Epub 2014 Jul 17.

Lung cancer in never-smokers: a case-control study in a radon-prone area (Galicia, Spain).

Author information

1
Service of Pneumology. University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
2
Dept of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela. Santiago de Compostela, Spain CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública, CIBERESP, Spain alberto.ruano@usc.es.
3
Service of Pneumology, Ourense Hospital Complex, Spain.
4
Service of Pneumology, University Hospital Complex of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain.
5
Service of Oncology, Pontevedra Hospital Complex, Pontevedra, Spain.
6
Service of Pneumology, Santiago de Compostela University Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
7
Service of Pneumology, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo, Spain.
8
National Institute of Silicosis, University Hospital of Asturias, Oviedo. Spain.
9
Service of Pneumology, Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol, Spain.
10
Dept of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela. Santiago de Compostela, Spain CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública, CIBERESP, Spain Service of Preventive Medicine. University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña Spain.

Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess the effect of residential radon exposure on the risk of lung cancer in never-smokers and to ascertain if environmental tobacco smoke modifies the effect of residential radon. We designed a multicentre hospital-based case-control study in a radon-prone area (Galicia, Spain). All participants were never-smokers. Cases had an anatomopathologically confirmed primary lung cancer and controls were recruited from individuals undergoing minor, non-oncological surgery. Residential radon was measured using alpha track detectors. We included 521 individuals, 192 cases and 329 controls, 21% were males. We observed an odds ratio of 2.42 (95% CI 1.45-4.06) for individuals exposed to ≥200 Bq·m(-3) compared with those exposed to <100 Bq·m(-3). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure at home increased lung cancer risk in individuals with radon exposure>200 Bq·m(-3). Individuals exposed to environmental tobacco smoke and to radon concentrations>200 Bq·m(-3) had higher lung cancer risk than those exposed to lower radon concentrations and exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Residential radon increases lung cancer risk in never-smokers. An association between residential radon exposure and environmental tobacco smoke on the risk of lung cancer might exist.

PMID:
25034571
DOI:
10.1183/09031936.00017114
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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