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Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2014 Aug;29(5):422-31. doi: 10.1093/arclin/acu029.

Embedded validity indicators on CNS vital signs in youth with neurological diagnoses.

Author information

1
Neurosciences Program (Brain Injury and Rehabilitation), Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada brian.brooks@albertahealthservices.ca.
2
Neurosciences Program (Brain Injury and Rehabilitation), Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Brain Health Program, Copeman Healthcare Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada.
3
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Calgary, AB, Canada Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program, Boston, MA, USA Copeman Healthcare Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

Computerized screening measures can provide valuable information on cognition. However, determining the validity of obtained data is critical for interpretation. The purpose of this study was to examine the embedded validity indicators on the CNS Vital Signs battery in a sample of youth with neurological diagnoses. The sample included 275 children and adolescents (mean = 13.9, SD = 3.0) with neurological disorders. Six out of seven subtests and six of the nine domain scores on CNS Vital Signs had fewer than 5% of the sample flagged as invalid on the embedded indicators. However, the Shifting Attention Test and its derived domain scores had higher rates of being flagged. Patients with one or more flagged scores (18% of sample) were younger and had lower intellectual abilities, psychomotor speed, verbal memory, and performance on other validity tests. Compared to stand-alone validity tests, CNS Vital Signs embedded validity indicators had low sensitivity. More research is needed with the embedded indicators in youth.

KEYWORDS:

Assessment; Childhood neurologic disorders; Children; Effort testing; Malingering/symptom validity testing

PMID:
25034266
DOI:
10.1093/arclin/acu029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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