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J Neurosci. 2014 Jul 16;34(29):9551-61. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4889-13.2014.

Cortical neurodynamics of inhibitory control.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15213, kah124@pitt.edu.
2
Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15213, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, and.
4
Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, and Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15213.

Abstract

The ability to inhibit prepotent responses is critical for successful goal-directed behaviors. To investigate the neural basis of inhibitory control, we conducted a magnetoencephalography study where human participants performed the antisaccade task. Results indicated that neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) showed significant task modulations in preparation to suppress saccades. Before successfully inhibiting a saccade, beta-band power (18-38 Hz) in the lateral PFC and alpha-band power (10-18 Hz) in the frontal eye field (FEF) increased. Trial-by-trial prestimulus FEF alpha-band power predicted successful saccadic inhibition. Further, inhibitory control enhanced cross-frequency amplitude coupling between PFC beta-band (18-38 Hz) activity and FEF alpha-band activity, and the coupling appeared to be initiated by the PFC. Our results suggest a generalized mechanism for top-down inhibitory control: prefrontal beta-band activity initiates alpha-band activity for functional inhibition of the effector and/or sensory system.

KEYWORDS:

antisaccade; inhibitory control; neural oscillations; prefrontal cortex

PMID:
25031398
PMCID:
PMC4099539
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4889-13.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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