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Kidney Int. 2015 Jan;87(1):169-75. doi: 10.1038/ki.2014.254. Epub 2014 Jul 16.

Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants associate with prevalent kidney but not prevalent cardiovascular disease in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial.

Author information

1
1] Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA [2] Center for Public Health Genomics, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
2
Internal Medicine-Nephrology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
3
Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
4
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
5
Medicine, Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
6
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
7
Medicine-Nephrology, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
8
Medicine-Nephrology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
9
Medicine-Hypertension, University Hospitals, Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
10
Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 coding variants are strongly associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in African Americans (AAs). Here APOL1 association was tested with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR), and prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 2571 AAs from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), a trial assessing effects of systolic blood pressure reduction on renal and CVD outcomes. Logistic regression models that adjusted for potentially important confounders tested for association between APOL1 risk variants and baseline clinical CVD (myocardial infarction, coronary, or carotid artery revascularization) and CKD (eGFR under 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and/or UACR over 30 mg/g). AA SPRINT participants were 45.3% female with a mean (median) age of 64.3 (63) years, mean arterial pressure 100.7 (100) mm Hg, eGFR 76.3 (77.1) ml/min per 1.73 m(2), and UACR 49.9 (9.2) mg/g, and 8.2% had clinical CVD. APOL1 (recessive inheritance) was positively associated with CKD (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.73) and log UACR estimated slope (β) 0.33) and negatively associated with eGFR (β -3.58), all significant. APOL1 risk variants were not significantly associated with prevalent CVD (1.02, 0.82-1.27). Thus, SPRINT data show that APOL1 risk variants are associated with mild CKD but not with prevalent CVD in AAs with a UACR under 1000 mg/g.

PMID:
25029429
PMCID:
PMC4281289
DOI:
10.1038/ki.2014.254
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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