Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Bone. 2015 Jan;70:48-54. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2014.07.011. Epub 2014 Jul 12.

iPS cell technologies and cartilage regeneration.

Author information

1
Cell Induction and Regulation Field, Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Japan; Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ntsumaki@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp.
2
Cell Induction and Regulation Field, Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Japan.

Abstract

Articular cartilage covers the ends of bone and provides shock absorption and lubrication to the diarthrodial joints. Cartilage has a limited capacity for repair when injured, and there is a need for cell sources for chondrocytes that can be transplanted as part of a regenerative medicine approach. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have pluripotency and the potential for self-renewal similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but are not associated with the ethical issues that have plagued ESCs. Recent progress has made it possible to generate integration-free iPSCs and to differentiate iPSCs toward chondrocytes. An iPSC library prepared from donors homozygous for common HLA types is being developed, and will be able to provide allogeneic iPSC-derived chondrocytes at low cost that can cover the majority of the population. As an alternative approach, chondrocytic cells can be induced directly from dermal fibroblasts without going through the iPSC stage. Another important application of the iPSC technology is modeling cartilage diseases, such as skeletal dysplasia. Chondrogenically differentiated iPSCs generated from patients would recapitulate the pathology, and may serve as a useful platform both for exploring the disease mechanisms and for drug screening. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Stem Cells and Bone".

KEYWORDS:

Cartilage regeneration; Direct reprogramming; Disease modeling; iPS cells

PMID:
25026496
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2014.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center