Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Oncotarget. 2014 Aug 30;5(16):6594-602.

Clinical significance of phenotyping and karyotyping of circulating tumor cells in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of GI Oncology, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing 100142, China.
2
Cytelligen, San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Karyotyping and phenotyping of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in therapeutic cancer patients is of particular clinical significance in terms of both identifying chemo-resistant CTC subtypes and understanding CTC evolution.

METHODS:

The integrated subtraction enrichment (SET) and immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) platform was applied to detect and characterize CTCs in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Status of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expressing and aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in CTCs enriched from the patients was examined by SET-iFISH following clinical chemotherapy or HER2-targeted therapy. CellSearch system was applied as a reference control.

RESULTS:

Phenotyping of CTCs in HER2 positive AGC patients demonstrated that HER2⁺ CTCs could be effectively eliminated in response to HER2-targeted therapy. Karytotyping of CTCs indicated that distinct CTCs with different ploidies of chromosomes 8 in AGC patients correlated to either sensitivity or resistance of paclitaxel or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Examination of the copy number of chromosome 8 in CTCs provides a potential approach for predicting chemotherapeutic efficacy and monitoring chemo-resistance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Phenotyping and karyotyping of the enriched CTCs upon ploidy of chromosome 8 or HER2 expression is of clinical potential for monitoring chemo-resistance and evaluating therapeutic efficacy for AGC patients.

PMID:
25026283
PMCID:
PMC4196148
DOI:
10.18632/oncotarget.2175
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Impact Journals, LLC Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center