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J Immunol. 2014 Aug 15;193(4):1544-8. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1302108. Epub 2014 Jul 14.

Cutting edge: An antibody recognizing ancestral endogenous virus glycoproteins mediates antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity on HIV-1-infected cells.

Author information

1
Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94110; Equipe Immunité et Cancer, Institut de Recherche en Cancérologie de Montpellier, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5, France; dnixon@gwu.edu henri-alexandre.michaud@inserm.fr.
2
Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94110;
3
Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94110; Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037;
4
HIV/AIDS Program, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94110;
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143;
6
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642;
7
Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR 97006; and Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR 97006.
8
Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94110; Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037; dnixon@gwu.edu henri-alexandre.michaud@inserm.fr.

Abstract

The failure of antiviral vaccines is often associated with rapid viral escape from specific immune responses. In the past, conserved epitope or algorithmic epitope selections, such as mosaic vaccines, have been designed to diversify immunity and to circumvent potential viral escape. An alternative approach is to identify conserved stable non-HIV-1 self-epitopes present exclusively in HIV-1-infected cells. We showed previously that human endogenous retroviral (HERV) mRNA transcripts and protein are found in cells of HIV-1-infected patients and that HERV-K (HML-2)-specific T cells can eliminate HIV-1-infected cells in vitro. In this article, we demonstrate that a human anti-HERV-K (HML-2) transmembrane protein Ab binds specifically to HIV-1-infected cells and eliminates them through an Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mechanism in vitro. Thus, Abs directed against epitopes other than HIV-1 proteins may have a role in eliminating HIV-1-infected cells and could be targeted in novel vaccine approaches or immunotherapeutic modalities.

PMID:
25024383
PMCID:
PMC4120895
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1302108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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