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Theriogenology. 2014 Sep 15;82(5):750-9.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2014.06.012. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Genome-wide profiling of sperm DNA methylation in relation to buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bull fertility.

Author information

1
Animal Genomics Lab, Animal Biotechnology Centre, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana, India.
2
Department of Animal Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA.
3
Artificial Breeding Research Centre, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana, India.
4
Animal Genomics Lab, Animal Biotechnology Centre, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana, India. Electronic address: tirthadatta@gmail.com.

Abstract

The DNA methylation pattern in spermatozoa of buffalo bulls of different fertility status was investigated. Spermatozoa isolated DNA from two groups of buffalo bulls (n = 5), selected based on their artificial insemination-generated conception rate data followed by IVF efficiency, were studied for global methylation changes using a custom-designed 180 K buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) CpG island/promoter microarray. A total of 96 individual genes with another 55 genes covered under CpG islands were found differentially methylated in sperm of high-fertile and subfertile buffalo bulls. Important genes associated with biological processes, cellular components, and functions were identified to be differentially methylated in buffalo bulls with differential fertility status. The identified differentially methylated genes were found to be involved in germ cell development, spermatogenesis, capacitation, and embryonic development. The observations hint that methylation defects of sperm DNA may play a crucial role in determining the fertility of breeding bulls. This growing field of sperm epigenetics will be of great benefit in understanding the graded fertility conditions of breeding bulls in commercial livestock production system.

KEYWORDS:

Buffalo; Bull fertility; Epigenetics; Methylation

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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