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Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Jan;11(1):70-98. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.04.514. Epub 2014 Jul 9.

At the interface of sensory and motor dysfunctions and Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA. Electronic address: albers.mark@mgh.harvard.edu.
2
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Oregon Heath & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
4
SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.
5
Volen National Center for Complex Systems and Department of Psychology, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA.
6
Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
8
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
10
Dept. of Neurology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
11
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
12
Bloedel Hearing Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
13
Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; Center on Aging, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.
14
Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
15
Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY, USA.
16
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA.
17
Division of Otology, Neurotology, & Skull Base Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
18
Departments of Neurology and Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine, Bedford, MA, USA.
19
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
20
Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.
21
Center for Alzheimer Disease and Related Disorders, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL, USA.
22
Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research and Institute on Aging, the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
23
Emotional Brain Institute, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA.
24
Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Recent evidence indicates that sensory and motor changes may precede the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by several years and may signify increased risk of developing AD. Traditionally, sensory and motor dysfunctions in aging and AD have been studied separately. To ascertain the evidence supporting the relationship between age-related changes in sensory and motor systems and the development of AD and to facilitate communication between several disciplines, the National Institute on Aging held an exploratory workshop titled "Sensory and Motor Dysfunctions in Aging and AD." The scientific sessions of the workshop focused on age-related and neuropathologic changes in the olfactory, visual, auditory, and motor systems, followed by extensive discussion and hypothesis generation related to the possible links among sensory, cognitive, and motor domains in aging and AD. Based on the data presented and discussed at this workshop, it is clear that sensory and motor regions of the central nervous system are affected by AD pathology and that interventions targeting amelioration of sensory-motor deficits in AD may enhance patient function as AD progresses.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Alzheimer's disease; Auditory function; Motor; Olfaction; Sensory; Vision

PMID:
25022540
PMCID:
PMC4287457
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2014.04.514
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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