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Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014 Jul 11;9:24756. doi: 10.3402/qhw.v9.24756. eCollection 2014.

A shifting sense of being: a secondary analysis and comparison of two qualitative studies on young-onset dementia.

Author information

1
Ageing and Health, Norwegian Centre for Research, Education and Service Development, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway; aud.johannessen@aldringoghelse.no.
2
Ersta Sköndal University College, Gothenburg, Sweden.
3
Ageing and Health, Norwegian Centre for Research, Education and Service Development, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway.
4
Faculty of Health Science, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate and interpret metaphorical expressions of the lived experiences of everyday life in people with young-onset dementia (YOD) and to compare these findings with findings from an analysis via grounded theory to see if the second analysis adds more knowledge to the topic. In this secondary analysis of data, metaphors from 20 Norwegian men and women living with YOD were investigated. Using Steger's anthropological three-step method, three categories were identified: Sliding away, leaving traces, and all alone in the world. Comprehensively, we understood the metaphors as representing the participants' shifting sense of being. The main findings of the study show that by analysing the data by combining and using both methods, more knowledge to the topic was added. Acknowledging metaphorical expressions as a source of knowledge, this study reflects on how metaphors can be used in therapeutic dialogue. We conclude that metaphors add to the understanding of descriptions of daily life in a more existential way, beyond the results gained from the grounded theory analysis. However, the findings from the analysis via grounded theory included aspects that we did not find when analysing the metaphors.

KEYWORDS:

Grounded theory; Steger; metaphors; subjective experiences; young-onset dementia

PMID:
25022268
PMCID:
PMC4095763
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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