Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Surg Educ. 2014 Nov-Dec;71(6):e33-40. doi: 10.1016/j.jsurg.2014.05.003. Epub 2014 Jul 8.

Are there gender differences in the emotional intelligence of resident physicians?

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: skmckinley@gmail.com.
2
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
ePsy Consultancy, Toronto, Canada.
4
Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Because academic literature indicates that emotional intelligence (EI) is tied to work performance, job satisfaction, burnout, and client satisfaction, there is great interest in understanding physician EI.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether gender differences in resident EI profiles mirror EI gender differences in the general population.

STUDY DESIGN (INCLUDE PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING):

A total of 325 residents in 3 types of residency programs (pathology, pediatrics, and general surgery) at 3 large academic institutions were invited electronically to complete the validated Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue), a tool consisting of 153 items that cluster to 15 independent facets, 4 composite factors, and 1 global EI score.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 42.8% (n = 139, women = 84). Global EI was not significantly different between men and women resident physicians (p = 0.74). Women scored higher than men in the TEIQue facets impulse control (p = 0.004) and relationships (p = 0.004). Men scored higher than women in 2 facets, stress management (p = 0.008) and emotion management (p = 0.023). Within surgery (n = 85, women = 46), women scored higher than men in impulse control (p = 0.006), whereas men scored higher in stress management (p = 0.008).

CONCLUSIONS:

Men and women residents across 3 specialties demonstrated near-identical global EI scores. However, gender differences in specific TEIQue facets suggest that similar to the general population, men and women residents may benefit from specific training of different EI domains to enhance well-rounded development. The lack of significant gender differences within surgery may indicate that surgery attracts individuals with particular EI profiles regardless of gender. Future research should focus on the functional relationship between educational interventions that promote targeted EI development and enhanced clinical performance.

KEYWORDS:

ACGME core competencies; Interpersonal and Communication Skills; Patient Care; Professionalism; emotional intelligence; gender differences; surgical education; surgical residency

PMID:
25012606
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsurg.2014.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center