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Urol Oncol. 2014 Oct;32(7):941-5. doi: 10.1016/j.urolonc.2014.02.019. Epub 2014 Jul 8.

Self-reported acne is not associated with prostate cancer.

Author information

1
Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
2
Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
3
Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
4
Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Endocrinology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Urology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Dermatology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
7
Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Urology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: bart.kiemeney@radboudumc.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Some studies have suggested an inverse association between acne vulgaris and the acne-related bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and prostate cancer (PCa). Self-reported acne might be an easily obtainable marker to identify men at relatively low risk of PCa and might be incorporated into PCa risk calculators. This study aimed to evaluate the association between self-reported acne and PCa in a large case-referent study.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

The case group comprised 942 patients with PCa recruited from a population-based cancer registry in 2003 to 2006, 647 of whom met the criteria for aggressive PCa. The referents (n = 2,062) were a random sample of the male general population. All subjects completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer, including questions about acne. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression for PCa and aggressive PCa as separate end points, while adjusting for age and family history of PCa.

RESULTS:

A history of acne was reported by 320 cases (33.9%) and 739 referents (35.8%). Self-reported acne was significantly associated neither with PCa (adjusted OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.80-1.12) nor with aggressive PCa (adjusted OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.80-1.18).

CONCLUSION:

Self-reported acne is not suitable as a marker to identify men at low risk of aggressive PCa.

KEYWORDS:

Acne vulgaris; Aggressive prostate cancer; Marker; Propionibacterium acnes; Prostate cancer; Risk factor

PMID:
25011577
DOI:
10.1016/j.urolonc.2014.02.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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