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Trends Mol Med. 2014 Aug;20(8):449-59. doi: 10.1016/j.molmed.2014.06.001. Epub 2014 Jul 6.

Osteoclasts: more than 'bone eaters'.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: aaliprantis@partners.org.

Abstract

As the only cells definitively shown to degrade bone, osteoclasts are key mediators of skeletal diseases including osteoporosis. Bone-forming osteoblasts, and hematopoietic and immune system cells, each influence osteoclast formation and function, but the reciprocal impact of osteoclasts on these cells is less well appreciated. We highlight here the functions that osteoclasts perform beyond bone resorption. First, we consider how osteoclast signals may contribute to bone formation by osteoblasts and to the pathology of bone lesions such as fibrous dysplasia and giant cell tumors. Second, we review the interaction of osteoclasts with the hematopoietic system, including the stem cell niche and adaptive immune cells. Connections between osteoclasts and other cells in the bone microenvironment are discussed within a clinically relevant framework.

KEYWORDS:

PTH; bone remodeling; osteoblast; osteoclast; osteopetrosis; osteoporosis

PMID:
25008556
PMCID:
PMC4119859
DOI:
10.1016/j.molmed.2014.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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