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Curr Opin Genet Dev. 2014 Jun;26:24-32. doi: 10.1016/j.gde.2014.05.005. Epub 2014 Jul 5.

Sirtuins, metabolism, and DNA repair.

Author information

1
Biological and Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
2
The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: rmostoslavsky@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Cells evolve to actively coordinate nutrient availability with cellular activity in order to maintain metabolic homeostasis. In addition, active pathways to repair DNA damage are crucial to avoid deleterious genomic instability. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that availability of intermediate metabolites may play an important role in DNA repair, suggesting that these two seemingly distant cellular activities may be highly coordinated. The sirtuin family of proteins now described as deacylases (they can also remove acyl groups other than acetyl moieties), it appears to have evolved to control both metabolism and DNA repair. In this review, we discuss recent advances that lay the foundation to understanding the role of sirtuins in these two biological processes, and the potential crosstalk to coordinate them.

PMID:
25005742
PMCID:
PMC4254145
DOI:
10.1016/j.gde.2014.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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