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Development. 2014 Jul;141(14):2760-9. doi: 10.1242/dev.102194.

Harnessing developmental processes for vascular engineering and regeneration.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, and The Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
2
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, and The Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21208, USA gerecht@jhu.edu.

Abstract

The formation of vasculature is essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration. During development, the vasculature forms via the dual processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, and is regulated at multiple levels: from transcriptional hierarchies and protein interactions to inputs from the extracellular environment. Understanding how vascular formation is coordinated in vivo can offer valuable insights into engineering approaches for therapeutic vascularization and angiogenesis, whether by creating new vasculature in vitro or by stimulating neovascularization in vivo. In this Review, we will discuss how the process of vascular development can be used to guide approaches to engineering vasculature. Specifically, we will focus on some of the recently reported approaches to stimulate therapeutic angiogenesis by recreating the embryonic vascular microenvironment using biomaterials for vascular engineering and regeneration.

KEYWORDS:

Angiogenesis; Biomaterials; Stem cells; Tissue engineering; Vasculogenesis

PMID:
25005471
PMCID:
PMC4197623
DOI:
10.1242/dev.102194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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