Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS Biol. 2014 Jul 8;12(7):e1001906. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001906. eCollection 2014 Jul.

Tracking genomic cancer evolution for precision medicine: the lung TRACERx study.

Author information

1
Translational Cancer Therapeutics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom.
2
Cancer Research UK & UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London, United Kingdom.
3
Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
4
Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, Manchester, United Kingdom.
5
Immune Regulation and Tumour Immunotherapy Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom.
6
Department of Medical Oncology, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
7
Translational Cancer Therapeutics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom.
8
Department of Pathology, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom.
9
Department of Bioinformatics and BioStatistics, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, London, United Kingdom.
10
Institute of Cancer Studies, University of Manchester and The Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.
11
Department of Respiratory Medicine, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom.
12
Department of Medical Oncology, Aberdeen University Medical School & Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom.
13
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
14
Department of Medical Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom.
15
Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, University of Leicester & Leicester University Hospitals, Leicester, United Kingdom.
16
Department of Clinical Oncology, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.
17
Department of Pathology, Aberdeen University Medical School & Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom.
18
Department of Pathology, University of Leicester & Leicester University Hospitals, Leicester, United Kingdom.
19
The Advanced Sequencing Facility, London Research Institute, London, United Kingdom.
20
Department of Radiology, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.
21
Department of Pathology, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.
22
Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Leicester & Leicester University Hospitals, Leicester, United Kingdom.
23
Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
24
Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
25
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Aberdeen University Medical School & Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
26
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Aberdeen University Medical School & Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
27
Department of Clinical Immunology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT.
28
North West Lung Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
29
Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.
30
Aberdeen Biomedical Imaging Centre, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United kingdom.
31
Department of Radiology, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
32
Department of IT, London Research Institute, London, United Kingdom.
33
Independent Cancer Patient's Voice, London, united Kingdom.
34
Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of South Manchester, Manchester.
35
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.
36
Department of Cellular Pathology, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
37
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
38
The Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom; Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of South Manchester, Manchester.
39
Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
40
Translational Cancer Therapeutics Laboratory, London Research Institute, London, United Kingdom.
41
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospitals of South Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
42
Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of South Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
43
The Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
44
Department of Radiology, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom.
45
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Leicester & Leicester University Hospitals, Leicester, United Kingdom.
46
School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
47
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Birmingham University Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
48
Translational Cancer Therapeutics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom; Translational Cancer Therapeutics Laboratory, London Research Institute, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The importance of intratumour genetic and functional heterogeneity is increasingly recognised as a driver of cancer progression and survival outcome. Understanding how tumour clonal heterogeneity impacts upon therapeutic outcome, however, is still an area of unmet clinical and scientific need. TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution through therapy [Rx]), a prospective study of patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), aims to define the evolutionary trajectories of lung cancer in both space and time through multiregion and longitudinal tumour sampling and genetic analysis. By following cancers from diagnosis to relapse, tracking the evolutionary trajectories of tumours in relation to therapeutic interventions, and determining the impact of clonal heterogeneity on clinical outcomes, TRACERx may help to identify novel therapeutic targets for NSCLC and may also serve as a model applicable to other cancer types.

PMID:
25003521
PMCID:
PMC4086714
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pbio.1001906
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center